Advisories and Releases

June 29, 2020 - UNC Charlotte Receives External Review of April 30, 2019, Campus Shooting

UNC Charlotte Receives External Review of April 30, 2019, Campus Shooting

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - June 29, 2020 - The University of North Carolina at Charlotte has received the external review it commissioned of the April 30, 2019, shootings that took the lives of Reed Parlier and Riley Howell and injured four other students in the Kennedy Building. The review was completed by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA) and the National Police Foundation (NPF). 

"The National Police Foundation commends UNC Charlotte leadership for commissioning this independent review to identify opportunities to enhance campus safety and resiliency," said Jim Burch, president of the National Police Foundation. 

The report focuses on four primary areas: leadership, relationships and preparedness; crisis communication; threat assessment; and mental health, resilience and recovery. The full report document is confidential because of safety and security planning and preparedness; a summary has been made available to the community. 

Among the areas of strength identified in the report were the initial law enforcement response; actions taken to secure the campus; campus leadership’s preparations for ongoing campus needs; and communication with the University community that focused on compassion and respect, according to Sue Riseling, now-retired executive director of IACLEA, who oversaw the review process. 

“UNC Charlotte did many things right on April 30, 2019, and in the days and months that followed,” said Riseling. “We made several recommendations for ways in which UNC Charlotte can strengthen their readiness for emergencies and crises, including the refinement and additional practice of existing plans and procedures. However, even with these recommendations, it was clear in our review that there was no information available to UNC Charlotte prior to the incident that would have identified the shooter as a threat or prevented the tragedy that unfolded.” 

Based on the recommendations, Chancellor Philip L. Dubois, in consultation with Chancellor-elect Sharon L. Gaber, has outlined the University’s immediate next steps:

  • A review and revision of the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and the configuration and location of its Emergency Operations Center (EOC), focusing on the development of specific procedures to govern the lifting of a campus lockdown order.
  • A review and revision of the crisis communications plan, focusing on the further specification of staff roles and responsibilities and coordination of public communications with external agencies involved in responding to a campus emergency.
  • Additional research related to strengthening the ability of the University to identify, assess and manage campus behavioral and threat-related concerns.
  • A review of training programs for dealing with campus emergencies, particularly those necessary for the onboarding of new senior administrators, and continuing attention to active shooter training for employees and students.
  • A senior-level dialogue surrounding community resilience planning, focusing on supporting the ongoing mental health services needed to address the psychological trauma experienced by many members of the campus community as a result of the shootings and the lockdown.

“I appreciate the thoroughness and professionalism of IACLEA and NPF in completing this review,” said Dubois. “Nothing can take away the grief of April 30 or the pain of losing Reed and Riley, but we hope to show our commitment to honoring their memory through our actions going forward. We take this report’s recommendations seriously, and we hope other universities and colleges around the nation will also benefit from the findings.” 

In total, the external review produced 31 findings and 79 recommendations for consideration by UNC Charlotte. As acknowledged in the review, many of the recommendations have already been addressed through the University's own after-action review that occurred shortly after the shootings.

About UNC Charlotte
UNC Charlotte is North Carolina’s urban research university. With an enrollment of nearly 30,000 students, the University leverages its location in the state’s largest city to offer internationally competitive programs of research and creative activity, exemplary undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs, and a focused set of community engagement initiatives.

About IACLEA
The International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA) is the leading authority for campus public safety. Since our founding in 1958, the Association has grown to more than 4,000 members in 11 countries. IACLEA is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors of police chiefs and public safety directors, with international representation. More information is available on iaclea.org and Twitter @IACLEA_Members.

About NFP
The National Police Foundation (NPF) is a non-partisan and non-membership 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to advancing the impact and delivery of police services through reforms and enhancements guided by innovation and science. For the last 50 years, the Foundation has led the development of research on all aspects of policing and leads the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement. The Foundation works with communities across the U.S. and internationally to provide research, training, and technical assistance relating to community engagement and problem solving, promoting safety and healthy organizations and officers, the reduction and prevention of violence, and equitable and fair justice for all. For more information, please visit the National Police Foundation website at www.policefoundation.org.

###

May 28, 2020 - NC Economic Forecast: Recovery Could Take Years

N.C. Economic Forecast: Recovery could take years
The North Carolina economy experienced its biggest decline since the Great Depression due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - May 28, 2020 ­– Just three months ago, the United States was seeing its longest economic expansion on record, a period of growth that started in 2010 and continued through February 2020. 

“Just three months ago, our major worries were whether a looming trade war with China was going to slow the economy down in 2020,” said John Connaughton, Barings Professor of Financial Economics at UNC Charlotte’s Belk College of Business. “For the second quarter of the year, the North Carolina economy, like the U.S. economy, experienced its biggest decline in Gross State Product (GSP) since the Great Depression of the 1930s.” 

Connaughton, presenting the quarterly Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast on Thursday, May 28, offered a few scenarios for the remainder of 2020. 

“Going forward from the middle of 2020, the No. 1 question is how long before the economy gets back to its 2019 level and when does the unemployment rate again approach full employment,” Connaughton said. 
 
Given the hit the economy took during the second quarter of 2020, it is likely to take until mid-2022 before Gross Domestic Product (GDP) recovers, he said. The unemployment rate will take even longer, another six to nine months, before it drops below 5%, Connaughton added.  

North Carolina GSP 
Inflation-adjusted real GSP is expected to decrease by 4.4% over the 2019 level, according to the report. Twelve of North Carolina’s 15 economic sectors are expected to experience output decreases during 2020, with the hospitality and leisure services sector seeing the largest decline, at 34.8%. 

Other sectors projected to decrease by over 5% are: 

  • Other services: -13.4% 
  • Construction: -8.8% 
  • Durable goods manufacturing: -7.0% 
  • Wholesale trade: -6.1% 
  • Educational and health services: -5.5% 

Only the agriculture and mining sector is expected to experience growth in 2020.  

State Employment Numbers
By December, seasonally adjusted nonagricultural employment in North Carolina is expected to decrease by 6.5% over the employment level in December 2019, a loss of 300,000 net jobs during the year, according to Connaughton.

Twelve of the state’s 14 nonagricultural sectors of the economy are expected to experience employment decreases during 2020.  The sectors with the largest expected employment decreases in 2020 are: 

  • Hospitality and leisure services: -25.8% 
  • Other services: -7.8% 
  • Retail trade: -7.0%
  • Transportation and warehousing: -7.3%
  • Manufacturing: -6.0%

According to the report, the North Carolina unemployment rate is expected to peak at 17.0% in May and be around 9.9% by December.

“Going forward, the one takeaway from this 10-year expansion is that the North Carolina growth rate over the period has trailed the U.S. 10-year average growth rate of 2.3%,” Connaughton said. “This is a consideration as we emerge from the COVID-19 shutdown. So, the big question is whether the North Carolina recovery will again be weaker than the U.S. recovery. This year and 2021 will be very interesting and very uncertain years.”

A Look Back 
2019 represented the 10th and final year of the economic expansion following the Great Recession, the longest expansion on record since 1854.  

“It is very likely that this expansion would have continued through at least 2020 and probably well into 2021,” Connaughton said. “However, we will never know. We will look back on this 10-year expansion as a positive and interesting decade.”   

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic forecast was presented in a virtual format for the first time in its nearly 40-year history. The full report is available at belkcollege.uncc.edu/forecast. Connaughton will release the next Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast report on Sept. 23. 

Connaughton is considered one of the top economists in North Carolina. He joined the UNC Charlotte faculty in 1978 and has served as director of the quarterly Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast since 1981. 


About the Belk College of Business
Accredited by AACSB International, the Belk College of Business at UNC Charlotte offers outstanding business education programs at the undergraduate, master’s, doctoral and executive levels. The Belk College is committed to building strong partnerships in the greater Charlotte region and beyond as a vital part of our mission as North Carolina's urban research business school. Find the Belk College of Business online at belkcollege.uncc.edu

About Barings
Barings is a global financial services firm with more than $227 billion in assets under management and over 2,000 associates who are dedicated to meeting the evolving investment and capital needs of the firm’s clients and customers. Through active asset management and direct origination, Barings provides innovative solutions and access to differentiated opportunities across public and private capital markets. The firm’s global headquarters is located at 300 South Tryon in Charlotte, and it maintains a strong international presence with business and investment professionals in offices throughout North America, Europe and Asia Pacific.

May 11, 2020 - UNC Charlotte Welcomes 11th Class of Prestigious Levine Scholarship Program

UNC Charlotte Welcomes 11th Class of Prestigious Levine Scholarship Program
Twenty-one Levine Scholars awarded merit-based scholarships 

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - May 11, 2020 - Twenty-one young leaders from across the United States have been selected as the 11th class of UNC Charlotte’s Levine Scholars Program, the University’s most prestigious merit-based scholarship. 

Valued at approximately $105,000 per North Carolina student and $155,000 for each student from other states, it covers full tuition, housing, meals, books, summer experiences and other expenses. Additional funding for the Levine Scholarship Program supports civic engagement opportunities and professional development during the scholars’ academic years.

Levine Scholars are selected through a robust nomination and interview process conducted by select faculty, senior University leaders, program alumni and distinguished members of the Charlotte community. This year, the program saw the highest number of completed applications in its 11-year history.

“The response of top students from North Carolina and across the country continues to be outstanding,” said Chancellor Philip L. Dubois. “As with the program’s first 10 classes, the students who join us this fall as Levine Scholars are among the very best. We are very pleased that they have chosen UNC Charlotte.”

Established in 2009 with a $9.3 million gift from Leon and Sandra Levine through their foundation, the Levine Scholars Program was created to recruit outstanding high school students based on scholarship, ethical leadership and civic engagement. In 2014, the Levines made an additional $13 million gift, which increased the scholarship from 15 recipients to approximately 20 each year beginning with the class of 2016.

“We continue to be impressed by the outstanding potential of the students who join the Levine Scholars Program,” said Leon Levine. “We look forward to watching them grow through their University experiences and see their ongoing impact in our community, region and nation.

This year’s class of 21 Levine Scholars includes 16 students from North Carolina and five students from outside North Carolina. 

North Carolina recipients are:

David Scott Buckner, Lowell, Ashbrook Senior High School; Bryant De Luna-Peralta, La Grange, North Lenoir High School; Patrick Thomas Deegan, Pittsboro, Woods Charter School; Kaitlyn Frances Gosline, Holly Springs, Wake STEM Early College High School; Karsyn Frances Koon, Harrisburg, Concord High School; Lucas Le, Wake Forest, Wake STEM Early College High School; Malachi Isaiah McMillan, High Point, Southwest Guilford High School; Galen Lucas Miller, Boone, Watauga High School; Brenda Lizeth Morales Flores, Thomasville, Ledford High School; Mia Alexander Nguyen, Matthews, Marvin Ridge High School; Ifeoluwa Joshua Onasanya, Waxhaw, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics; Joysan Jolene Osteen, Hendersonville, Brevard Senior High School; Roshna Ragunathan, Mooresville, South Iredell High School; Jamari Levon Tyson, Raleigh, Wake Early College of Health and Sciences; Jordane Hugh Martin Williams, Fayetteville, Terry Sanford Senior High School; Braelin Alexander Yarborough, Wendell, East Wake High School.

Out-of-state recipients are: 

Natalie Claire Bates, Kingsport, Tennessee, Dobyns-Bennett High School; Mary Catherine Messina, Saint Louis, Missouri, Cor Jesu Academy; Jesse Avery Smith, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Albuquerque Academy; Audrey Noel Whisnant, Tucker, Georgia, DeKalb School Of The Arts; Zoe Margaret Ziegler, Boise, Idaho, Boise High School.

Individual headshots of the Levine Scholars can be downloaded here.

###

May 4, 2020 - UNC Charlotte Center City Named in Honor of Philip L. and Lisa Lewis Dubois

UNC Charlotte Center City Named in Honor of Philip L. and Lisa Lewis Dubois
The Dubois Center at UNC Charlotte Center City honors the legacy of retiring Chancellor and First Lady

CHARLOTTE, N. C. – May 4, 2020 -  UNC Charlotte is recognizing the legacy of retiring Chancellor Philip L. Dubois and First Lady Lisa Lewis Dubois by renaming the University’s uptown Charlotte Center City Building in their honor. Regarded as a centerpiece to Dubois’ 15-year term as chancellor, the 11-story glass structure on the corner of 9th and Brevard Streets will now be known as The Dubois Center at UNC Charlotte Center City (The Dubois Center). 

The $50.4 million facility, which opened in fall 2011, is the only University of North Carolina classroom building conceived and designed specifically to serve the business, organizations and people in an urban center. The Uptown campus building is part of the 1.2 billion facility construction and renovation program Dubois completed during his tenure as chancellor. The space, which accommodates more than 1,300 students annually who are earning bachelor’s or master’s degrees plus almost 2,600 more participating in continuing education options, includes 25 state -of-the-art classrooms and design studios, meeting and performance spaces. The Projective Eye Gallery, located near the lobby, regularly exhibits the work of artists known locally, nationally and internationally.

“Phil came to me with this audacious idea of starting a new campus right in the middle of uptown Charlotte,” said Erskine Bowles, president of the UNC System when the concept was first proposed. “Over time, we were able to convince the legislature this building could make an enormous difference, that it could drive business and opportunities for Charlotte and the region for decades to come.”

Proximity to the University’s highly ranked part-time MBA evening program and continuing education programs for those who live and work uptown, as well as to more than 1,800 University, corporate and community events every year fulfill Dubois’ original vision to elevate the University’s profile in the Charlotte region and beyond.

“We knew we needed to have a more substantial and visible presence,” Dubois said. “That led to the decision to make our No. 1 campus construction priority a new building in Center City.”

Dubois’ foresight has been confirmed by the subsequent development of the surrounding neighborhood, which includes installation of popular First Ward Park, positioned between The Dubois Center and the city’s thriving business district, and a new light rail station, which provides more than 100 daily stops to the University’s main campus in University City.

Throughout the city, including on the main campus, are evidence of the civic contributions of Lisa Lewis Dubois, efforts that extend far beyond the traditional role of a university first lady. A passion for providing a platform for women led to serving as co-chair of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Women’s Summit, whose outcomes guided the implementation of the Women+Girls Research Alliance, which collaborates as a University entity with the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. Her imprint is evident on numerous education and cultural efforts that have made a difference in the lives of countless Charlotteans. 

“The legacy of Chancellor Phil Dubois and First Lady Lisa Lewis Dubois is not limited to their leadership within the walls of the UNC Charlotte campus,” said Michael L. Wilson ‘93, chair of the UNC Charlotte Board of Trustees. “They have worked diligently to connect UNC Charlotte to the greater Charlotte community; as the city grew, UNC Charlotte grew with it.”

The Dubois Center at UNC Charlotte Center City is more than just a building; it’s a tangible example of the University serving the needs of a growing urban region, consistent with the institution’s mission.

“The change in the University’s visibility has paid real dividends,” Dubois said. “I feel good about leaving UNC Charlotte in a strong position as an integral partner in this great city.”

To read more about the Dubois’ leadership at UNC Charlotte, visit the Dubois Legacy Series. Visit the UNC Charlotte media assets website for a collection of photos and videos of The Dubois Center.

###

April 29, 2020 - Campus Coverage for April 30, 2020

MEDIA ADVISORY 
April 30, 2020 Campus Coverage

Thursday, April 30 marks the one-year anniversary of the tragic events that took place on UNC Charlotte's campus. As the day approaches, we are focused on the remembrance of Reed Parlier and Riley Howell and honoring Drew Pescaro, Emily Houpt, Rami Alramadhan, Sean DeHart, and all the students in the classroom that day. Remembrance, safety and security, and the support of students, faculty and staff are among our most important priorities. 

Media on Campus: Media is welcome to visit campus for b-roll and live shots throughout the day. Please let UNC Charlotte media relations know when you plan to be on campus. Campus buildings are not currently open to the public. If you approach people on campus for interviews, please adhere to social distancing protocols and interview from a safe distance.

Campus Leadership Interviews: Please contact UNC Charlotte media relations to schedule all interviews. Campus leaders can be made available throughout the week for virtual or phone interviews. 

Chancellor Philip Dubois will be briefly available on the morning of April 30. Please call UNC Charlotte media relations to schedule a short interview.

United: A Remembrance Program: A virtual remembrance event will stream from UNC Charlotte's live stream websiteFacebook page and Twitter account beginning at 5:10 p.m. Please feel free to stream or record segments of the program for use on your channels.

Resources and Information: An informational document is attached to this email that may be helpful for your reporting efforts. Additionally, a new media assets website has been created and features useful visual campus assets and specific content related to April 30, 2019.

Parking: Media trucks can park on University Road (beside the Rowe Arts Building and next to Hechenbleikner Lake) or on Library Lane. Please do not park in accessible parking spaces or block the flow of traffic.

April 28, 2020 - UNC Charlotte Chancellor-elect Information

MEDIA ADVISORY 
UNC Charlotte Chancellor-elect Information

Today, UNC System Interim President William L. Roper named Dr. Sharon L. Gaber as UNC Charlotte’s fifth Chancellor. UNC Charlotte Board of Trustees Chair, Michael L. Wilson, who led the search committee, shared this message with the campus community.

Information about the Chancellor-elect can be found on the Chancellor-elect website, including the UNC System news release, a message from Michael Wilson, the Chancellor-elect’s biography and curriculum vitae, and additional media resources.

Interview Requests: All future media interview requests for the Chancellor-elect will be coordinated through a digital request form.

Resources: Photos of the Chancellor-elect can be found on the new media assets website under the collection “Chancellor-elect.” An introduction video from the Chancellor-elect will be posted later this afternoon on the Chancellor-elect website, UNC Charlotte's official Facebook page and Twitter account, and will be made available on the media assets website.

Media contact: Media inquiries related to today’s announcement should be directed to UNC System Director of Media Relations Jason Tyson at jtyson@northcarolina.edu or 919-962-7296.

###

April 22, 2020 - School of Data Science Now Enrolling Students for Fall

UNC Charlotte News

UNC Charlotte School of Data Science Now Enrolling Students for Fall
Data science will create an estimated 11.5 million jobs nationally by 2026

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – April 22, 2020 - UNC Charlotte’s School of Data Science, North Carolina’s first undergraduate program in data science, is now enrolling undergraduate students for the fall semester. The program, the first of its kind to incorporate the liberal arts and sciences with technical data skills, allows the School of Data Science to expand its efforts in helping to meet the soaring demand for qualified, dynamic data science professionals throughout the region and the nation. 

Bioinformatics.jpgCurrent students are able to register for the program’s first two introductory courses available this fall, where they will learn to apply statistical methods, tools and script programming languages to explore the ethical implications of collecting and using tabular data. Incoming freshmen and transfer students will have the opportunity to learn more about the bachelor’s degree program during Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR) sessions this summer in preparation for fall 2020 registration. 

“This new program will give organizations that recruit large numbers of data science professionals insight into that talent pipeline much earlier in the hiring cycle,” said Ned Carroll, senior managing director and chief data officer for TIAA. “Today, we identify data science talent through computer science, statistics, applied mathematics and similar degree programs. While we likely will continue to find talent in those disciplines, this degree will provide a more targeted view into early talent, in particular, potential data science interns and employees who possess the combination of skills we seek for building a meaningful future pipeline of qualified data experts.”

Career options for graduates of the new data science undergraduate program include data science engineer, data analyst, research engineer, data science developer, among others. To meet employer demand, the program offers courses in machine learning, data analysis, statistics, data visualization and--key to the overall nature of SDS bachelor’s and master’s degree programs --the ethics surrounding the field of data science

“Building on the success of our master’s programs, our goal is to provide students of all backgrounds with the educational opportunities to apply data science to the fields they’re passionate about,” said Doug Hague, executive director of UNC Charlotte’s School of Data Science. “As we continue down the path toward a more digitalized world, I’m confident that SDS graduates will lead the way in solving some of the world’s largest problems.” 

The Bachelor of Science in Data Science program marks the latest expansion of the interdisciplinary partnership among the College of Computing and Informatics, the Belk College of Business, the College of Health and Human Services and the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. The program will begin this fall, pending approval from the U.S. Department of Education.

To learn more about the School of Data Science’s bachelor's degree, visit the Data Science website

April 14, 2020 - April 30 Day of Remembrance to be Observed Virtually

April 30 Day of Remembrance to be Observed Virtually
UNC Charlotte will live stream ‘United - A Remembrance Program

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – April 14, 2020 - Today, UNC Charlotte shared alternative plans for the remembrance events scheduled for April 30, 2020, due to the current stay-at-home environment. To observe the one-year anniversary of the events on April 30, 2019, a tragic day in campus history, UNC Charlotte will recognize the day with a virtual event, “United - A Remembrance Program,” on April 30, 2020, at 5:10 p.m. 
 

4.30 SOC Collage Logo.jpgThe event will pay tribute to Reed Parlier and Riley Howell, and honor the four injured students and all the students in the classroom that day. It will broadcast from UNC Charlotte’s live stream website (livestream.uncc.edu) and made available on the UNC Charlotte Facebook and Twitter channels. 

“Even though we will not be able to conduct planned remembrance ceremonies in person, it doesn’t mean the day will have any less significance,” Chancellor Philip L. Dubois said. “Perseverance is a trademark of Niner Nation, and we are committed to finding meaningful ways to honor the lives lost and all those affected.”

The program will feature messages from Chancellor Dubois, Student Body President Chandler Crean, Student Body Vice President Adela Mann, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Kevin Bailey, and a special appearance from CBS News correspondent and alumnus, Don Dahler (’91). 

In addition, the event will share an artistic video created by faculty member Jeff Murphy and accompanied by an original composition written by faculty member John Allemeier, as well as musical performances by “Water From Fire” featuring alumni John Woodall (’13) and Kevin Brawley (’13). All participant biographies and program details can be found on the Niner Nation Remembers website.  

###

March 11, 2020 - Baring/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast

North Carolina's Economic Forecast: 'Sluggish Growth' for Remainder of 2020

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - March 11, 2020 - John Connaughton, Barings Professor of Financial Economics at UNC Charlotte’s Belk College of Business, is forecasting an extended period of “sluggish growth” for the state’s economy in 2020. 

“The bump up to a 3% annual GSP [Gross State Product] growth rate that was promised as part of the 2018 tax cut appears to be over,” Connaughton said. “The benefit that the January 2018 tax cuts provided are substantially offset by the ongoing trade dispute with China. At this time, there does not seem to be a resolution to this dispute in the foreseeable future, and the forecast for the remainder of 2019 and all of 2020 reflects this fact. In addition, the recent outbreak of coronavirus in China and other nations is beginning to have a real impact on U.S. growth prospects during the first half of 2020.”

Connaughton forecasts 13 of the state’s 14 non-agricultural economic sectors are expected to experience employment increases in 2020. Sectors with the strongest growth include:

  • Construction: 6.4%
  • Utilities: 5%
  • Durable goods manufacturing: 4.3%

The North Carolina unemployment rate is expected to decline slightly throughout 2020 to 3.5% by December, he said. GSP for 2020 is expected to reach $612,844.5 million in 2020.

Connaughton presented his quarterly economic forecast report to members of the Charlotte business community and the media Wednesday, March 11, at UNC Charlotte Center City. The event is sponsored by Barings.

State’s Annual Growth Rate Trails National Average

On paper, North Carolina’s 10 consecutive years of economic growth are impressive, Connaughton said. However, taking a closer look, the size of that economic growth–averaging less than 2% per year–trails the U.S. 10-year average annual growth rate of 2.3%.

“While the U.S. productivity growth has been slow by historical standards, North Carolina’s productivity growth has been even more sluggish over this expansion,” he said.  

For 2019, the forecast found: 

  • The state added 93,900 net jobs.
  • Twelve of the state’s 14 nonagricultural sectors of the economy experienced employment increases.  
  • The sectors with the strongest employment increases were hospitality and leisure services at 5.9% and information at 5%.

The full report is available at belkcollege.uncc.edu/forecast. A new forecast video will be posted on the website by Friday, March 13. Connaughton will release the next Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast report on May 28.

Connaughton is considered one of the top economists in North Carolina. He joined the UNC Charlotte faculty in 1978 and has served as director of the quarterly Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast since 1981. 

Downloadable Assets.jpg Economic Forecast_March 11.jpg

Downloadable media assets

March 2020 Economic Forecast Presentation

 

About Barings
Barings is a global financial services firm with more than $335 billion in assets under management and over 2,000 associates who are dedicated to meeting the evolving investment and capital needs of the firm’s clients and customers. Through active asset management and direct origination, Barings provides innovative solutions and access to differentiated opportunities across public and private capital markets. The firm’s global headquarters is located at 300 South Tryon, and it maintains a strong international presence with business and investment professionals in offices throughout North America, Europe and Asia Pacific.

 
About the Belk College of Business

Accredited by AACSB International, the Belk College of Business at UNC Charlotte offers outstanding business education programs at the undergraduate, master’s, doctoral and executive levels. The Belk College is committed to building strong partnerships in the greater Charlotte region and beyond as a vital part of our mission as North Carolina's urban research business school. Find the Belk College of Business online at belkcollege.uncc.edu.

March 9, 2020 - Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast Set for March 11

What: UNC Charlotte economist John Connaughton will present his quarterly forecast on the North Carolina economy during the Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast on Wednesday, March 11. 

When: Networking/lunch begins at 11:30 a.m.; the presentation begins at noon

Where: UNC Charlotte Center City, 320 E. 9th Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 

About: In addition to his regular quarterly update, Connaughton will focus on:

  • His new research on North Carolina's productivity in the 21st century. Is the state’s economic development policy stifling expansion? 
  • The economic impact of the coronavirus, which has slowly spread to the United States.

Connaughton is considered one of the top regional economists in North Carolina. The Barings/UNC Charlotte Economic Forecast, sponsored by Barings, covers the state’s industrial sectors and measures the health of the state economy. Connaughton, Barings professor of financial economics at UNC Charlotte's Belk College of Business, also will cover national and international economic issues, including employment, energy, trade and government spending.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is requested at belkcollege.uncc.edu/forecast.

Media Information: Dr. Connaughton will be available on-site for follow-up questions until 1:15 p.m. and will be available by phone after 1:30 p.m. on March 11. The Belk College of Business will live tweet from the Forecast through its Twitter page (@UNCCBelkCollege) with  #NCForecast

Parking/Transportation: Due to construction and other activity surrounding UNC Charlotte Center City, parking is extremely limited. The parking lots adjacent to Center Center are reserved only for faculty, staff and students with university-issued parking permits and are no longer available for event guest parking. 

Parking is not guaranteed and may be limited at these locations. Media and guests are encouraged to use light rail or alternative transportation.

Parking for those with a valid handicap placard is available in the paved lot across from Center City (no additional permit needed).